Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Septic Friendly Homemade Laundry Detergent Recipe

Not long after I posted my recipe for Homemade Laundry Detergent, my septic tank began to overflow onto my lawn!  Oh dear!  I frantically looked through my records to see when it had last been pumped only to find it had been done last in June of 2007.  Because we are a large family and are home all day contributing to the contents of the septic tank, it had been recommended that we pump every 2.5 to 3 years.  I faithfully wrote the date of the last pumping on the last page of each year's calendar in order to keep track.  But I guess I forgot to be faithful, because it wasn't on last year's!

The septic tank was 1.5 years overdue for pumping and had several hundred extra gallons to pump.  When the septic man pumped it, he found that the reason for overflow was a clogged filter.  I asked him what he felt had contributed to the clogging, and he described the clogging as "fibrous," which he said is most often attributed to garbage disposal use.  Anyone who has a septic should know that garbage disposals are a big no-no, as they inundate the septic tank with more organic matter than the poor little bacteria can deal with in a timely fashion.  I was guilty of using it to clear out any stray food that had fallen into my drain beyond my sink strainer.  I asked him what else he noticed about the filter, and he said he noticed "little white flecks" all over it, which he hadn't encountered before.

This is what gave me a red flag regarding my homemade laundry soap.  I don't know if it is what was causing those white flecks, and if those flecks caused the clogging, but I don't want to find out by having to replace a failed septic drain field, so I am changing my recipe.  I asked the septic guy if he thought any of my ingredients sounded like a problem, and he said that powders were the main thing he had problems with in detergent.  If they are not fully dissolved, they cake in the septic, becoming like rock.  i didn't know this at all, and have used powdered dishwasher detergent for the 7 years we have lived here.  I have also used powdered laundry soap in the past.  I was thinking of switching to using the dry version of the typical homemade laundry soap recipe, but no more.  In my new recipe, I was certain to check that the powders I used were completely dissolved when I was finished.  I do know that I've seen anecdotal evidence all over cyberspace that many people have used the standard homemade laundry soap recipe with little incidence to their septic, but I also see that no one seems to know if it if for sure septic safe.  I have seen several incidences of people having major problems with soap flakes clogging their septic fields and causing them to fail.  This is enough to make me cautious.

It is also a common rule of thumb for septic system maintenance that fats and greases should not be sent into your septic tank because they can clog inlet drains and don't degrade quickly.  One of the main ingredients in the homemade laundry detergent recipe is Fels Naptha Soap/or Zote soap.  Soaps are made with oils or fats, and should probably be avoided in excessive amounts, such as is used laundry for 7 people!  I could not find specific documentation in what sorts of oils or fats are used in the soaps in these recipes, but by virtue of them being soaps, I am assuming them to be less septic friendly, because oils and fats don't degrade quickly in septic tanks and can cause problems.

So, without further delay, here's my recipe, partially based on what another gal I read about online is doing to avoid using soap in her homemade laundry detergent.  Sorry, I can't find her post, but if you do, please post it in the comments for me.



Homemade Laundry Detergent


2 cups Washing Soda
1 cup Borax
1 cup citric acid 


Fill 5 gallon bucket half full with warm water.  Dissolve Washing Soda and Borax in water by stirring thoroughly.  Fill to about 2 inches from top, then add citric acid, stirring again.  A fizzing reaction will happen when the citric acid reacts with the washing soda, creating carbon dioxide and sodium citrate, another compound that is often added to many green detergents and shampoos as a chelating agent (meaning it takes up the hard water metal ions in water.)  Don't worry, it doesn't overflow. It just makes a cool fizzing action and is done.  Then, add a little more water if desired, and you're done.  Use 1 cup per load for sparkly clean clothes.  

The recipe is essentially my previously posted recipe, but doubled, with no bar of soap, and with citric acid added.  Citric acid is used in detergents to break down food and hard water films.  I added it out of experience with homemade dishwasher detergent recipes.  Vinegar can have a similar, yet less productive effect.  I talked to a chemist friend, because I had noticed that a lot of non soap based detergents used enzymes to break down food stains, and I wondered if citric acid could be used instead.  I also was concerned that I would lose the full effect of the citric acid because of the fact that citric acid and washing soda react in solution, forming sodium citrate and carbon dioxide.

Here's what he said:
"It takes four to five one hour lectures in freshman chemistry to get the concept of how weak acids like citric acid and vinegar (AKA acetic acid) interact with strong bases like NaOH (the masochist out there can Google Acid Base Equilibrium). Bottom line here is that this effect is not negated since a fair amount of the desired component exists in solution. The underlying questions is what in this mixture is doing what. In order to keep a septic system clean and functional you need bacteria to digest the organic materials. Things like citric acid will do this by breaking down the proteins and polysaccharides into component amino acids and sugars which the bacteria use as a food source. The use of enzymes is sometimes preferred since the enzymes can do this much faster than simple acids."

So essentially, my solution should work very well both as a detergent and for the health of my septic system, because I have 4 things working for me in solution: Washing Soda (deemed septic safe on the manufacturer's website, and acting as a grease cutter), Borax (which is deemed septic safe on the box, useful in cleaning, deodorizing and brightening clothing),  Citric Acid, which, as my chemist friend said, breaks down proteins and fats common in food stains, and making them more easily digested by my septic tank bacteria, and Sodium Citrate (because of the chemical reaction between the Citric Acid and Washing Soda), said to be biodegradable and septic safe and used as a chelating agent to bind with the minerals in my hard water, so that the rest of the ingredients can do their job.

Here's a great link to directions to make your own enzymes from orange peels, thus saving money on citric acid, and giving your detergent and septic an extra boost, by breaking down the proteins and fats faster.  My chemist friend said he would assume that, strained, you could use it cup for cup as a replacement for the citric acid.  I plan on doing this while I use up my citric acid I ordered, as it cost me $4.56 per pound.  I have also considered possibly using  commercial product called "lemi-shine" in a pinch.  It has "real fruit acids and natural citrus oils" as ingredients.  I am not sure if these would be the same as my citric acid and have no idea what they cost, pound for pound.
http://happyhomemaker88.com/2009/05/02/recipe-for-homemade-citrus-enzyme-a-natural-cheap-effective-all-purpose-cleaner/

I hope you benefit from this recipe.  I can't guarantee that it's totally septic safe, as I have only used it for a week, but from the research I have done, it seems that it is.  Please use your own judgement as usual regarding what you use in your home as a detergent.  For me, it works wonderfully.


Addendum as of 6/1/2011--Today at Safeway, I bought a 5 pound box of Biz Stain Fighter powder.  It contains enzymes, which is the next thing I wanted to try in my detergent.  I plan on adding one cup to the solution I already have,  just to see if it will make a difference.  My husband is wearing a shirt that, when he sweated, got a little of that old shirt smell, possibly from having been washed in the non-soap detergent.  I am hoping that these enzymes in Biz will do the trick.  It has been around for 40 years, and I'm pretty sure it's the detergent my husband's grandma raves about.  It is biodegradable, contains no phosphates, no chlorine bleach.  It is safe for septic tanks.  At $7.99 a box, it should be an affordable alternative for the Fels Naptha Soap, if it only requires one cup per batch of soap.  We'll see how it works, and I'll update this post.

11/11/11--I am still using ONLY this detergent for our clothes.  I have changed the recipe to save Biz and Citric acid.

This is it:
2 c. Washing Soda
1c. Borax
1/2 c Citric Acid
1/2 c Biz

Our clothes are bright!  I am very happy with this formula.

71 comments:

  1. WOW, you're amazing. I would have just gone on using the detergent and hoped for the best. You are so proactive!!!!

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  2. Wishing for an update as I want to try making my own, but don't want to mess up my septic.

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  3. Weird, I thought I had posted an update!!! The detergent works great. I have been using it ever since I changed the recipe. It's perfect!

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    1. Thanks, this is great news. I think I'll add the citric and use Biz. I'm on sewer, but better cleaning and saving $$ is what I like.

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  4. In the 11/11/11 recipe, is that 1/2 c Biz?

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  5. Where do you buy citric acid? Or should I just use vinegar?

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  6. I have a friend who has a soap business and makes bath bombs. She buys citric acid in bulk from "Shay and Company" 6lbs are $20 and 50lbs is $85. It lasts forever, even in the six pound amount, which I purchased through my local health food store. It has lasted six months so far and I still have lots left.

    I have read that Fruit Fresh and unsweetened lemonade packets also contain citric acid. You can even make your own: See the link below.

    http://happyhomemaker88.com/2009/05/02/recipe-for-homemade-citrus-enzyme-a-natural-cheap-effective-all-purpose-cleaner/

    All that being said, you may get a similar but less strong effect from vinegar. You'd have to decide what you want to try.

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  7. The Shay and Company kind of citric acid has $20 shipping charge, so I'm wondering if I can find another brand or type online with cheaper shipping but not sure what type of citric acid I need...food grade,etc. I'm totally hooked on your last recipe so I'm super excited to try the new one!!

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  8. You can buy fruit.fresh I think in your baking aisle at the grocery or.order through a local health food store or pharmacy.

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  9. I meant that you could order plain citric acid through the pharmacy or health food store. So glad u love the recipes!

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  10. Wow! You are amazing! This is the research I needed! So...adding dry ingredients to the water makes it disolve acceptably to be considered liquid? I guess so! My goodness! Now all I need you to do is the same research for liquid dishwasher detergent that is effective!! The Borax, baking soda, vinegar combo does more damage than good...plus, u know it's supposed to be in liquidation form.

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  11. Glad this helps. I wish I had a great recipe for the dishwasher detergent. My attempts flopped and my family was grumpy at the film of borax and baking soda left on the dishes. Maybe I'll have the energy during spring break time. Or maybe one of my readers will be inspired and post a link to a great recipe they've developed!

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    1. i don't know if it'll work for you, but i recently saw a suggestion to use 2 Tablespoons of baking soda, and a few drops to 1/2 teaspoon of regular liquid dishsoap in place of store bought dishwasher detergent. i seemed to have less film on my dishes. (i would try a few drops of dawn or a 1/2 tsp of dollar store dishsoap)

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  12. I'll keep checking back! Great blog! OH do your clothes ever feel "crispy" from the Borax combo? Or does "liquifying" it clear that up?

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  13. No, the clothes don't feel crispy at all. A friend of mine even took these ingredients, mixed them dry and dissolved them in her wash water and had no problems with residue. I am not having any septic problems since I eliminated the soap fat from the recipe, so it looks to be working well.

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  14. Oh dear, I thought of something. My washer is HE. I don't know if this is meant for that. I have such a horrible combination of problems...

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  15. My cousin is doing some research for me in this direction. I'm going to read the articles she sends my way. I'll give my educated opinion, but in the end, I think the responsibility for risk lies with each of us. I HOPE you can use it in an HE washer.

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  16. You're right. I could run my own experiments, with less than half the amount on an express cycle. If It's low sudssing, then I would go up from there, or keep it at half, as that is what a lot of detergents recommend. Thanks, again and I'll keep checking back for updates!

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  17. Here is the post my cousin found regarding use in He washers.

    http://www.diynatural.com/simple-easy-fast-effective-jabs-homemade-laundry-detergent/

    This person uses the ivory soap and has no problem with sudsing. Because what we are using makes no suds at all, we have no problems. I didn't understand what the difference with He washers was. I have asked my other friends who use the soap. One uses my recipe as a powder without even dissolving it. She just puts it in the dispenser of the He washer and allows it to dissolve in the load. She uses 2 Tablespoons. If it's a really dirty load she sprinkles some powder directly over the clothes.

    Another friend uses the ivory soap version in her He washer and has no troubles. It seems that this should be fine to use in He washers, and as I've said before everyone makes their own choice in the end based on what they have learned!

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  18. I made this last night plus I put in 1/2 C baking soda. When I checked it this morning it is still like water. Does this not thicken up any? And, if it doesn't I'm ok with it. I just want to make sure I made it correctly and the consistency is correct. :-)

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  19. Oh and should I not have added the baking soda?

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  20. It is supposed to be washing soda. It does not gel...just looks like water

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  21. Sorry I should have said additional ingredient.
    I did 2 c borax, 1 c washing soda, 1/2 c biz, 1/2 c baking soda and 1/2 c citric acid.

    Ok then I did it correct since it looks like water. That is good to me that way I can put and dispense from any container. Thanks!

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  22. OK, I am confused, it turns into a true liquid? Or it is just easier to dissolve once you put it into the washer? Also, how much do you use for a full load?

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  23. OOPS, it isn't a powdered detergent at the end, you are still using a 5 gallon bucket of water :)

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  24. So is this safe for HE washers or not?

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  25. It makes no suds, so in that respect, it seems to be safe. I have no guarantees ultimately on the safety of the detergent. It's make and use at your own risk. I know that it is working for several people with He washers, and also for many other people with regular washers.

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  26. Just a quick clarification...you went from 2c. of washing soda and 1c. of Borax and then changed to 2c. borax and 1c. washing soda...plus the citric acid, biz, etc...just wanted to make sure the washing soda and borax was listed correctly in your most recent recipe...thanks so much!

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  27. wow, the update was up since november and you were the first to notice the error. thank you! the recipe I use is the same as the original, but with 1/2 cup of citric acid and 1/2 cup of biz. I find the biz really helps get out any dinginess and buildup on the clothes.

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  28. Hi! I am wanting to try a home made detergent to save money and also use one that is healthier for our skin. Do you find that the home made recipe you are using is worth the time and effort and cost vs a store bought brand? Any recommendations would be wonderful!

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  29. Yes, I buy ingredients once every 3 or 4 months as opposed to buying a jug of detergent every month. It is WAY cheaper, and way easier than driving to the store. Dump in the ingredients, put in water, then use them!

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  30. Before I make this, should I expect the final product to be more of a watery consistency?

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  31. yes. It looks like water, but when you rinse your hands after touching it, they feel distinctly slippery.

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  32. I'm really excited to start making this. My daughter is on a tight budget and I have several kids still at home. She has a top loader machine and I have a HE machine. How much do you use per load of the finished detergent?

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  33. Can you add 1 C BIZ and no Citric acid? Or is the Citric acid a must????

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  34. Yes, I have done that successfully.

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  35. OH MY GOSH! So I have been having issues with our septic backing up a smell in our house... and this could be the answer I was looking for. I have been making my own detergent and liking it for quite a while. I LOVE Fels Naptha.... it is something my mom used when most people have never even heard of it... but I think that it might be causing my problem. Thanks for the new recipe. Now what do I do with all of my soap? :/

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  36. Has anyone used this recipe (the 1/2 biz, 1/2 citric acid formula) on baby clothes and cloth diapers? Would either of those ingredients possibly cause irritation on sensitive skin? Thanks for this great article!

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  37. Do you have a top or front loading washing machine? If it is a top loader, does anyone know how much to use in a front loading machine?
    Many thanks!

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  38. @ M... Donate your unusable soap to a needy family!

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  39. Quick question.. We have a septic system as well and I would love to try this.. I like my clothes to "smell" nice when they are washed.. What can I add to this that might be safe for my septic system but make my clothes smell great? I am all about my laundry smelling great! haha Thanks. :D

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  40. Yes, I have the same question as Amber. I am going to be living in the country after nearly 50 years of city living, and city water. Finding out items I can use now is a whole new world of explanation.Thanks for your input.

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  41. For a couple of years I've been skipping the softener and adding essential oils to the softener dispenser. Lavender is a good one to start with as it's one of the few essential oils that's safe to use undiluted on skin. If you have sensitive people, you could add an extra rinse for the first few loads. My combo in an HE washer is usually about 7 drops of Lavender, 4 drops Tea Tree and 7 drops of Lemon. Subtle scent and all sorts of good anti-bacterial, anti-microbial and anti-fungal properties!

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  42. Okay so we're moving into a new house with a Septic System & I have an HE front loader washer! How much should I use?! And is the 2 cups Washing Soda, 1 cup Borax, 1/2 cup Citric Acid & 1/2 cup Biz safe for the septic & HE?! I was confused because I saw someone post something about 2 cups of Borax & 1 cup of Washing Soda?! This will be my first time doing my own.. Thanks! =)

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  43. My recipe is very similar and do not have septic issues. Keep in mind that I have a double load HE frontloader. I use both Liquid and powder interchangeably. If you are using to much likely it will cause issues but that is true of any detergent. This stuff is a powerful cleaning agent. In my double loader I use 1/4 cup liquid or 2 tablespoons of powder. I had installed a grey water pit/field for my sinks and washer bc the commercial detergents are far worse. I did this way before I gave any thought making my own. To cause septic problems you would need to do 3 loads a day for a year or two everyday! But any detergent on the market would cause septic issues if used this much. Advice I can say works for me is use it sparingly as it is powerful or install a grey water leach pit/field it is simple to do yourself or inexpensive for someone to dig and run for you. As far as the HE washer yes it is great to use since it is virtually 'suds' free :) also I make my own fabric softener fabric softener commercially purchased from the store is terrible for you and your clothes. It is loaded with toxic chemicals, it deteriorates your clothes, and lessens the absorption of towels when used on a towel load. Remember your skin is your largest organ you have. It absorbs everything it is in contact with. The use of toxic chemicals to do laundry makes my skin crawl. I make and sell the detergents locally. If yer interested in it but do not want to make it your self send me an email kerryprattjr@ymail.com It is cheap I am not looking to get rich or retire off this stuff I just like people to be aware that there are always healthy alternatives to almost everything.

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  44. Many people have used this recipe successfully in HE washers because it doesn't produce suds. I don't have an He washer so I can't guarantee it. This is all an experiment, but so far it has worked well. The recipe below is the same as the one i have above. I use 1 c. biz and leave out the 1/2 c Citric Acid. When I find an affordable source for the citric acid, I will use it again.


    2 c. Washing Soda
    1c. Borax
    1/2 c Citric Acid
    1/2 c Biz

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  45. THis is very interesting to me as I, either assumed or heard, that Fels Naptha was ok for septic tanks. I have an HE washer and have been making my soap for over a year. In fact I just made a batch last week that will last me close to a year. I have a large family and do about 2 loads a day. Is the problem from using dry or just from the bars in general? If I add the Biz to this mix will it help with already having the bars?

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  46. FLushPro Septic and Plumbing, located in Covington, Georgia, was founded in order to assist homeowners with septic tank maintenance, pumping, and cleaning as well as normal plumbing needs. FlushPro Septic and Plumbing is fully licensed, bonded, and offers a warranty with all of their plumbing and septic work. Estimates are free and there is no additional charge for weekend, holiday, or emergency after hours work.

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  47. Hello...I have been using a version of your laundry detergent. We have a septic system and after reading your post I'm wondering if I'm doing the right thing in using a powder version. After doing a lot of reasearch on homemade laundry detergents, I came up with my own recipe using Jillee's as inspiration: http://www.onegoodthingbyjillee.com/2012/04/super-fast-and-easy-homemade-laundry-detergent.html

    Here's my recipe: equal parts of Borax and Washing Soda and throw in a few scoops of Oxi-clean...the cheaper stuff at the dollar store works just fine. I'm thinking that the Oxi-Cleans does the same thing as the Biz. I love this laundary detergent...my clothes come out very soft and clean smelling...no scent. I did read on another site, that people who are using cloth diapers, use a similar version of this using more Oxi-Clean without any problems. Peditricians had recommened using Dreft and some parents were using a similar recipe as mine to save money.

    5 cups of Borax
    5 cups of Washing Soda
    2 scoops of Oxi-Clean

    If you are doing a load of whites that are particularly dirty, throw another scoop of Oxi-Clean in the washer. For a full load of clothes, I use about 1/4 cup of my powder, less for a smaller load. I think I should be ok using this powder, I start the washer on warm water, throw in the powder and after a few minutes, switch to cold water unless I'm doing an all whites load. I also will squirt in a a couple of squirts of Gain DISH detergent. (Jille uses Dawn).
    Mary

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  48. I really don't know the answer. I have been using this detergent for two years now with no ill effects to the septic, but I do dissolve it in water before using.

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  49. TWO YEARS? Wow! Did your septic service have anything to say last time you had it pumped? Very interesting. You've done some fabulous research!

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  50. Could you use bottled lemon juice in place of the citric acid? Where do you get citric acid? Also I use a mix of vinegar / cheap hair conditioner/ water to make a homemade softner, it works great! The clothes are very soft and also I have noticed a lot less wrinkling, even if the clothes have been sitting in the dryer for awhile ;)

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  51. barefootmommy, I notice you do not mention if you are using a whole house water softener. When using a water softener you are supposed to use less of soap/detergent since your water is no longer hard. Is your 1 cup per load for softened water or hard?

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  52. Since i wrote this, I have talked to my husband, and discovered that what I thought was a water softener was indeed not. So we are talking about hard well water coming right on in.

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  53. This has been incredibly informative... I have super-crazy hard water and a septic system. I prefer powder homemade detergent for space/ease reasons, but your post has me re-thinking this! I'm wondering if you've ever thought of/tried keeping it in powdered form and then just diluting it prior to putting it in your washing machine... I'm wondering, if I were to do something like that, how much I'd need to dilute per load...

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  54. I use this recipe and I love it, I bought a cheap 2.5 gallon container with dispense nozzle and just cut the recipe in half, I also added some unstoppables ( downy and gain make them) just to give it a slight nice smell, but even without them it still smells nice.

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  55. I did some research and found that "fizzing" action is actually the creation of carbon dioxide from the mixing of citric acid and washing soda....just thought you'd like to know!

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  56. heres a link to 5lbs of citric acid for under $20
    http://www.amazon.com/Spicy-World-Citric-Acid-5-Pound/dp/B000OZFECU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1373715758&sr=8-1&keywords=citric+acid

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  57. Well, everyone I hate to bust in but, for a few years I used to make my own detergent. Almost the same I did not use biz. I had a major clock in my septic and it backed up to my house. Problem being the powders will dry up again after use and cause a rock solid block after building up. Not trying to be the bad one here. I am still again looking for a new idea. For now I use mrs Meyers . I love it and you use a lot less so not so expensive in the end. Safe for everything....

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  58. I have read the article and comments but I don't know if I'm reading over it or not, but what is the shelf life on this. I'm just wondering, you know how long can it sit before or if it will go bad you know what I mean.

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  59. Ok. First, Soap, as in lye-and-fatty-acids Soap, does not 'contain' neither lye or fatty-acids when it is processed and cured correctly. The chemical process, instead, leaves behind soponofied tallowate or soponofied palmoate or saponofied cocoate...depending on the oil or fat used; and glycerine. In the soap-making process at a commercial venture, the majority of the glycerine is most often seperated to be used for other products like medicines and moisturizers so that the resulting product cures more firm and also dries more quickly. Therefore, the thought that soap 'contains' fat is erroneous.

    With that said and understood, the glyceride-based deposits can sometimes occur with repeated, heavy application.... as in 2-3 loads of laundry per day on average for a household of 7 people (maybe). I, too, live in a household with a very small septic tank. I have used the Fels-Naptha recipe for years and have had no issues. I wanted to add that I also started to use a modified DIY bathbomb recipe for dropping in the toilet to freshen and easily clean it between scrubbings. The recipe can be found here: (http://www.mariasself.com/2013/08/diy-toilet-bombs-deodorize-kill.html)
    It seemed to help the septic 'hold it's own' during heavy water usage periods. After reading your aricle I now know why. The citric acid in the bombs must be aiding the decomposition of the other materials that may occassionally find their way down the drain. I would never have known that if I had not read your article! Thank you so much for sharing what you have learned. :)

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    1. How great to know that you are having success, likely due to the citric acid helping to break down things. I am curious to see how my septic system has held up as I have it pumped this fall for the first time since writing this article. Hopefully it'll show similar success. if not, I will report here.

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    2. @ Dani Massey

      If the essential oils have "great antimicrobial properties" wouldn't this be harmful to a septic tank? I have read to not even use 'anti-microbial' hand soap for that reason.

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  60. I saw in the comments that you're still using Biz. Do you mix all the powders and then dissolve it before use or mix it w/ water and store it that way? The box of Biz I just got says not to store diluted solution in sealed container because it can burst and to use w/in 6h of mixing or it loses potency. Have you found this to be true if you dilute it then store it? Thank you for your time and sharing this recipe.

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    1. I think you're right. Next time I make up the batch, i think I'll not add the biz, and instead add a bit to each load so that it doesn't lose its potency.

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    2. Could you mix it and leave it dry and then dilute as you do your laundry?

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  61. One thing you didn't mention, Lint, from towels and other types of fabrics. It can really clog a Septic tank quickly, and it's not a cheap fix. I use those mesh thingy's that are designed to fit on the end of the tube that's attached to the back of the Washing Machine, where the soapy water comes out. The mesh lint catcher will fill up with lint and other bebris quite quickly, so they are only recommended if you have a deep utility sink. You can also buy filters specially designed to catch lint before it gets to the Septic, they're about $100. I don't have a sink, so I stand there and watch it until the machine is emptied, with one hand on the stop button, in case it starts to overflow due to excessive lint. I learned about holding the stop button the hard way.
    Doing it this way is worth it to me, as I've heard that the fix is over $1000.00, not to mention the mess from a backed up Septic.

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  62. During drain field repair clogs can generally be administered in the home. Keep in mind, with a septic system, you do not desire to certain chemicals put into the pipes because they can injure the system badly.
    Drainfield Repair

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  63. I've used the homemade laundry soap a couple years back, and I only used it for 10 months or so, and we have been have to get out septic tank cleaned out twice a year and there are only 3 adults and 2 kids living in the house. We believe that its from that soap that is forming cement clots in our system. Was there a solution you put down the septic to break up the clots or dissolve them so they would flow freely in the lateral field?

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